“The pressure for a teenager to work is great, and not just because of the economic plight in the world today. Much of it is peer pressure to have a little bit of freedom and independence and to have their own spending money. The concern we have is when the part-time work becomes the primary focus. ” These are the words of Roxanne Bradshaw, educator and officer of the National Education Association. Many people argue that working can be a valuable experience for the young.

However, working more than about fifteen hours a week is harmful to adolescents because it reduces their involvement with school, encourages a materialistic and expensive lifestyle and increases the chance of having problems with drugs and alcohol. Schoolwork and the benefits of extracurricular activities tend to go by the wayside when adolescents work long hours. As more and more teens have filled the numerous part-time jobs offered by fast-food restaurants and malls, teachers have faced increasing difficulties. They must both keep the attention of tired pupils and give homework to students who simply do not have time to do it.

In addition, educators have noticed less involvement in the extracurricular activities that many consider a healthy influence on young people. School bands and athletic teams are losing players to work and sports events are poorly attended by working students. Those teens who try to do it all for examples homework, extracurricular activities and work may find themselves exhausted and prone to illness. A recent newspaper story, for example, described a girl in Pennsylvania who came down with mononucleosis as a result of aiming for good grades, playing on two school athletic teams and working thirty hours a week.

Another drawback of too much work is that it may promote materialism and an unrealistic lifestyle. Some parents claim that working helps teach adolescents the value of dollar. Undoubtedly that can be true. It is also true that some teens work to help out with the family budget or to save for college. However, surveys have shown that the majority of working teens use their earnings to buy luxuries such as video game systems, CD players and disks, clothing and even cars. These young people, some of whom earn $400 or more a month, do not worry about spending wisely as because they can just about have it all.

In many cases, experts point out, they are becoming accustomed to a lifestyle they would not be able to afford several years down the road, when they no longer have parents paying for car insurance, food, lodging and so on. At that point they will be hard-pressed to pay for necessities as well as luxuries. Finally, teenagers who work a lot are more likely than others to get involved with alcohol and drugs. Teens who put in long hours may seek a quick release from stress, just like the adults who need to drink a couple of martinis after a hard day at work.

Stress is probably greater in our society today than it has been at any time in the past. Also, teens who have money are more likely to get involved with drugs. Teenagers can enjoy the benefits of work while avoiding its drawbacks, simply by limiting their work hours during the school year. As is often the case a moderate approach will be the most healthy and rewarding. OUtLINE Paragraph 1 (Introduction) I. Leading sentence: “The pressure for a teenager to work is great, and not just because of the economic plight in the world today.

Much of it is peer pressure to have a little bit of freedom and independence and to have their own spending money. The concern we have is when the part-time work becomes the primary focus. ” II. Summary of main points: Working more than about fifteen hours a week is harmful to adolescents because it reduces their involvement with school, encourages a materialistic and expensive lifestyle and increases the chance of having problems with drugs and alcohol. Paragraph 2 (First Supporting Point) I.

Transition sentence: Schoolwork and the benefits of extracurricular activities tend to go by the wayside when adolescents work long hours. II. Supporting point: III. Evidence: Learning through travel by using the example of a trip to Greece. Paragraph 3 (Second Supporting Point) I. Transition sentence: “While I treasure the various worlds my mother has opened to me abroad, my life has been equally transformed by what she has shown me just two miles from my house. ” II. Supporting point: Her mother’s dedication to the community. III.

Evidence: Her multiple volunteer activities such as helping at the local soup kitchen. Paragraph 4 (Conclusion) I. Transition sentence: “Everything that my mother has ever done has been overshadowed by the thought behind it. ” II. Reiteration of main points: “She has enriched my life with her passion for learning, and changed it with her devotion to humanity. ” III. Taking it one step further: “Next year, I will find a new home miles away. However, my mother will always be by my side. ” COMPLETED ESSAY It took me eighteen years to realize what an extraordinary influence my mother has been on my life.

She’s the kind of person who has thoughtful discussions about which artist she would most want to have her portrait painted by (Sargent), the kind of mother who always has time for her four children, and the kind of community leader who has a seat on the board of every major project to assist Washington’s impoverished citizens. Growing up with such a strong role model, I developed many of her enthusiasms. I not only came to love the excitement of learning simply for the sake of knowing something new, but I also came to understand the idea of giving back to the community in exchange for a new sense of life, love, and spirit.

My mother’s enthusiasm for learning is most apparent in travel. I was nine years old when my family visited Greece. Every night for three weeks before the trip, my older brother Peter and I sat with my mother on her bed reading Greek myths and taking notes on the Greek Gods. Despite the fact that we were traveling with fourteen-month-old twins, we managed to be at each ruin when the site opened at sunrise. I vividly remember standing in an empty amphitheatre pretending to be an ancient tragedian, picking out my favorite sculpture in the Acropolis museum, and inserting our family into modified tales of the battle at Troy.

Eight years and half a dozen passport stamps later I have come to value what I have learned on these journeys about global history, politics and culture, as well as my family and myself. While I treasure the various worlds my mother has opened to me abroad, my life has been equally transformed by what she has shown me just two miles from my house. As a ten year old, I often accompanied my mother to (name deleted), a local soup kitchen and children’s center. While she attended meetings, I helped with the Summer Program by chasing children around the building and performing magic tricks.

Having finally perfected the “floating paintbrush” trick, I began work as a full time volunteer with the five and six year old children last June. It is here that I met Jane Doe, an exceptionally strong girl with a vigor that is contagious. At the end of the summer, I decided to continue my work at (name deleted) as Jane’s tutor. Although the position is often difficult, the personal rewards are beyond articulation. In the seven years since I first walked through the doors of (name deleted), I have learned not only the idea of giving to others, but also of deriving from them a sense of spirit.

Everything that my mother has ever done has been overshadowed by the thought behind it. While the raw experiences I have had at home and abroad have been spectacular, I have learned to truly value them by watching my mother. She has enriched my life with her passion for learning, and changed it with her devotion to humanity. In her endless love of everything and everyone she is touched by, I have seen a hope and life that is truly exceptional. Next year, I will find a new home miles away. However, my mother will always be by my side.